2nd Generation Specific 1986-1992 Discussion

small problem

Old 03-24-2006, 01:45 AM
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my engine hoist broke, and i had planned to pull the engine out of my car this weekend, so here's my question:

how hard would it be for me and one of my friends to pull the engine out without the hoist? what are my other options? would it be possible for us to lift it out by hand? any suggestions would help, and if i dont have to spend any money, i can afford to work on the engine when i get it out instead of having to wait for the next paycheck. thanks.
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Old 03-24-2006, 08:48 AM
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I wouldn't try lifting it out without a hoist or some reasonable facsimile thereof. Borrow a hoist, or get a rope and a bunch of pulleys, a come-along, or something to take the majority of the weight. It's one thing to say that you and a friend can "lift" an engine. It's a whole 'nother thing to say that you can hold onto it long enough to get it out of the car. And the cost of a hoist might seem really cheap next to a stack of medical bills.



Get another friend to video the event just in case something interesting happens.
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Old 03-24-2006, 09:33 AM
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Me and someone else lifted an engine out of my parts car. I laid a long wooden post across the engine bay, strapped the block to it, and we lifted from either side. The car was raised up, so we couldn't get it all the way over the front bumper. It smacked the radiator a few times, and I eventually got it to "roll" out onto the ground.



But hey, we got it out!
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Old 03-24-2006, 11:28 AM
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I've used a come-along to pull a motor out. What a hassle! It almost broke the beam I had it attached to....the whole building was moving! Plus, it took a hour to crank the engine out. When I finally got a lift, it took 5 minutes. I recommend borrowing a lift or buying another. Is it just not pumping or it boom(support beam) broken? If it's the hydralic jack you can go out and buy a used one. A friend and I had to do that for our lift, cost like 40 bucks and worked great.
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Old 03-24-2006, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by SEDave' post='809764' date='Mar 24 2006, 09:28 AM

I've used a come-along to pull a motor out. What a hassle! It almost broke the beam I had it attached to....the whole building was moving! Plus, it took a hour to crank the engine out. When I finally got a lift, it took 5 minutes. I recommend borrowing a lift or buying another. Is it just not pumping or it boom(support beam) broken? If it's the hydralic jack you can go out and buy a used one. A friend and I had to do that for our lift, cost like 40 bucks and worked great.
the support beam twisted and i dont trust it anymore
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Old 03-24-2006, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Kirk' post='809771' date='Mar 24 2006, 01:20 PM

the support beam twisted and i dont trust it anymore


What were you pulling?



I'd get somebody to weld some metal on it and beef it up. It's got to be better than no hoist at all. If you pull everything off the motor first, they really don't weigh all that much.
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Old 03-25-2006, 11:44 PM
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i think it would be hard to get it out of the car, but it was pretty damn easy for me and my dad to carry my longblock from the bed of the truck about 10 ft to the concrete floor.if it was my car i wouldnt risk dropping it on the car lol, id wait or engineer another way to go about it.
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Old 03-26-2006, 03:45 AM
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That's no problem at all. I just did this on Friday with a 2x4. Two of us were able to get it most of the way and a third spotted. Cake.



Removal of the radiator is a good idea in any case. Or a piece of plywood in front of it.



The key is to get the chain just tight enough to allow the crossmember through and clear the fenders. So you have room to lift up w/o running out of reach.
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Old 03-26-2006, 02:18 PM
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well at a junk yard me and my dad were pulling a short block 12A , and me and him got on each side ( we were standing inside the engine bay) and lifted it out..... if you stip it to bare block and drain all the oil they arent tooo heavy....



now since it was a beat up junk yard car we sat the engine on the front nose of the car, and then we jumped out and then lifted it into the wagon..... so if u do that u might dent up the front of the car so that might not work to well for you.....





another idea might be to remove the trany, tear it down to short block put a jack under the block and lower the block into the trany tunel and slide it out from the bottom..
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