2nd Generation Specific 1986-1992 Discussion

Bad fuel lines

Old 12-28-2010, 06:25 PM
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So, after a little experimentation with fuel pressure to get some more stability out of the engine, my fuel lines burst open. So curiously, where's the best place to pick some up and how hard is the operation to perform?
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Old 12-28-2010, 08:01 PM
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Rubber fuel lines I'm assuming? As long as they don't have crimped fittings to steel lines you can get them at any pArts store and cut them to length with a knife. If they are crimped lines you'll have to order them specific for your car. I prefer o'reilly's for parts because of their decent prices and quality.
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Old 12-29-2010, 12:55 AM
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How hard is the install?
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Old 12-29-2010, 06:12 AM
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Usually not bad. The hardest part is usually getting the fuel line off, but I live in the north where any fitting is a pain to remove. Do you have any line wrenches?
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Old 12-29-2010, 07:11 AM
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No line wrenches.
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Old 12-29-2010, 07:52 AM
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On the FC, all the lines are clamped (no crimped lines) from the factory. It's not a terribly difficult process, but sometimes the rubber lines somehow fuse to the metal (or at least it feels like it). There aren't many soft lines; 2 run from the feed and return line on the driver side firewall to the fuel rails, a short length is between the rails, and I *think* there's a short length of rubber hose at the tank, but not positive.



I found it helpful to remove the clamp, grab the rubber hose where it slips over the metal hose gently with pliers, and twist to break the "seal". Then they usually slip right off.



Save the factory hose clamps, and reuse those.



The harder part would be if you want to change the fuel lines under your intake manifold (to your fuel rails). You'd have to remove the manifold go get to them.
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Old 12-29-2010, 09:12 AM
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Well I haven't located the leak exactly, but it's looking dangerously close to my intake, but my brother spotted the gas primarily spattered onto the block, sizzling away. I'm hoping I don't have to yank off the manifold, but it would still be easier than my 3000GT, so I'm down for whatever.
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Old 12-29-2010, 05:31 PM
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The intake manifold for rotaries don't have coolant running through so it's not that bad. You should be able to do all you need to by just removing the upper intake manifold and you'll be able to see the injectors as well.
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Old 01-06-2011, 01:11 PM
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So I was looking at it again; just had so much going on lately, a project car would only exasperate me. Anyway, all I'm gonna have to do is unbolt the intake? I mean I see a lotta business going on in that area, so I'm just wanting to be sure before I put a wrench to anything.
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Old 01-06-2011, 02:05 PM
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You will most likely need:

new intake manifold gasket (the old one will rip apart)

new fuel lines (obviously)

probably new vacuum hose, the old stuff gets brittle and hard, that's all the black hoses you see there, it's cheap stuff though



And the thing you really want to watch out for, is the oil metering lines. They get brittle and break if you look at them cross-eyed, and new ones aren't cheap. Some folks have had good luck using weed wacker fuel line to replace the stock ones, but that requires some ingenuity on your part. Mainly, DO NOT TOUCH the oil metering lines when working in that area.



Messing with all that stuff can seem daunting the first time, since you don't know what you're looking at, but just take your time and it's fairly simple.



Oh, and while you're there, you might want to look into replacing your fuel pulsation damper. It's at the end of the primary fuel rail (the one under the manifold), and has been known to leak and burn cars to the ground.
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