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Old 10-26-2003, 07:34 PM   #1
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For some time no company's have been offering cryo treated engine parts. Meaning they dip your engine parts in liquid nitrogen, in order to make them "STRONGER"... Well people i was looking into getting my remanufactured engine cryo treated, but first i asked my dad, who has been a cryogenic technican for 15 years if this process would be worth my hard earned $. He laughed in my face. Cryo treating your parts does absolutely nothing to your engine. It is not any stronger, cant hold higher boost pressure, nothing. dipping anythind in liquid nitrogen just freezes it. like everything else your engine will thaw out in a matter of minutes. I strongly advise any of you looking into this process to forget about it, and if you don't belive me just call up a cryo tech and ask him.



here is a link to where my dad and many other cryo techs work you could probably find a number here. www.fnal.gov

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 10-26-2003, 07:38 PM   #2
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dipping finished engine parts will do nothing but ruin them (the crystal structure will change when the metal shrinks, you cannot expect it to go back to the same speced size).



However, cryo-quenching recently cast parts can and will strengthen the steel. The rapid cool-down can align crystal structures within the metal matrix.
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Old 10-26-2003, 07:44 PM   #3
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I never thought about recently cast products, so i asked my dad about it. He said that the only thing that would result from dipping a recently cast product into liquid nitrogen would be the crystalization process would slow down. not accellerate. So this is a pharse and people are wasting there money.
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Old 10-26-2003, 07:56 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by volcom121' date='Oct 26 2003, 06:44 PM
I never thought about recently cast products, so i asked my dad about it.* He said that the only thing that would result from dipping a recently cast product into liquid nitrogen would be the crystalization process would slow down. not accellerate.* So this is a pharse and people are wasting there money.
I mean, when the steel is still glowing hot you can do a two stage quench: oil then cryo. This does work. It's used to strengthen and stabilize the steel in knives. However, as steel gets harder, it gets brittle. Also, with the massive temp changes that an engine experiences, brittle steel might shatter.
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Old 10-26-2003, 08:00 PM   #5
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Thats true, but im talking about dipping rotor housings, rotors, apex seals, clutches, and ect. Already forged products. and non metal products. Cryo treating them has no effect.
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Old 10-27-2003, 12:14 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by volcom121' date='Oct 26 2003, 09:00 PM
Thats true, but im talking about dipping rotor housings, rotors, apex seals, clutches, and ect.* Already forged products. and non metal products.* Cryo treating them has no effect.
who cryos clutches anyway?



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Old 10-27-2003, 09:04 AM   #7
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Cryod brake rotors have been proven time and time again to be much better than stock. One example in particular, with the untreated rotors, they were replacing rotors after every event. The rotors were cracking from the heat. One set of cryod rotors lasted them a whole season without any problems.



So tell me again why it is useless?
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Old 10-27-2003, 02:39 PM   #8
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You must live near me if your dad works at fermi? where you from?



my buddy seva used to work there in computing, theres alot of cool stuff to play with there.
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Old 10-27-2003, 07:19 PM   #9
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Stop talking and start reading!



http://www.eng-tips.com/threadhome.cfm?tp=1



under Cryogenic engineering Forum



the value of cryogenics has been proven to be very useful even if not fully understood in many applications.
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Old 10-27-2003, 09:38 PM   #10
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About 2 years ago, a buddy and myself went through the process of making our own set of cyro rotors and placed them on his 1986 Audi GT coupe. The main advantage of the cryo rotors is that you can move up to a more agressive brake pad with-out killing your rotors. After 2 years of daily driving and one 9 hour night rally through icy roads the rotors have shown little to no wear and we never achieved excessive brake fade. We did get some vibration under heavy breaking, we could never figure if that was from the cryo process exposing weaknessess in the crappy rotors we bought, poor calipers or my cnc program was too aggressive and slightly warped the rotors while being cut.



Cyro process does not make a material stronger, but cuts down on wear (Friction and heat). I've heard of it being used in stamping dies, machines, welding, aerospace and NASCAR engine parts. Note: If the cryo process is done right (14 to 18 hours), a piece should stay dimensional correct. Dipping it in liquid is only good for interference fits and to expose weaknessess (As used in the Aerospace industry).



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